April 14, 2014
Product Review: Warby Parker Eyeglasses and Sunglasses
One of the common frustrations in my day-to-day life is the fact that I have bad eyes. They are weak in the sun, dry at night, and aren’t particularly good at seeing things that are close by or far away. It’s been a constant source of annoyance over the years, but I’ve quickly found that the best way to manage them is to take good care of them. Of course, anyone with a prescription knows the out-of-control cost of glasses these days; as you can probably imagine, that’s where Warby Parker comes into play.
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For those that don’t know, Warby Parker entered the eyewear business several years and has since become the go-to place for affordable, attractive, and well-made glasses. I would take a moment to explain Warby Parker’s business model, but it has become so well-known that I now seen other companies referred to as “the Warby Parker of _____” It goes without saying that their “cut-out-the-middleman, try-on-at-home” philosophy has been extremely successful; if you’re not familiar with how it works, read here and here.
Warby Parker’s business model is certainly interesting, but it becomes much more so with a good understanding of the eyewear market. For instance - if you’re not already familiar with the brand Luxottica, they’re essentially a huge behemoth of a company that owns all the glasses manufacturers and retailers you can think of (yeah, all of them). Essentially, this means that if you’re not buying glasses from a small handful of companies - like Moscot, Garrett Leight, Randolph Engineering, and a few others - you’re stuck sending your money to an enormous corporation that has an incredible amount of control over the price of glasses. Warby Parker is a breath of fresh air in this regard, and I’m sure that one of the ways they can offer such a great price is the fact that they are not connected to Luxottica or one of the other major eyewear companies.
As for my two pairs, I own the "Lyle" prescription frames and the "Sinclair" sunglasses (currently only available as optical). The sunglasses are about two years old now, and the optical frames are fairly new. Neither have had any mechanical problems with loose screws or hinges, and the acetate has no signs of age beyond the expected amount of wear. 
I’ve accumulated some dings and scratches on the sunglasses, but I’m honestly surprised they’re aren’t worse off given how hard I use them. I also just learned that WP will replace scratched lenses for free within the first year, which is more than reasonable (lenses can be replaced for a small fee after one year). These shades are with me every time I leave the house, and have seen a lot of action over the past two years. I’d like to expand my sunglasses collection a bit so that I have a few options, but for the time being these have been lifesavers.
Besides having the standard UV protection, all of WP’s sunglasses are also polarized; this makes a huge difference, and also usually incurs a large price increase. For those that aren’t familiar, polarized lenses reduce glare and increase clarity by filtering out horizontal light - this makes them great for water-related activities like sailing (although it will make the screen of your iphone look weird). The shape of the Sinclair frames is simple and unassuming, along with being slightly narrow for my small head. The burgundy fade colorway is a nice subtle bit of distinction, too.

My “Lyle" frames are quite new, but I have had no problems with the prescription lenses or hardware. I was able to take a quick photo of my prescription card and attach it to my order, and the rest was taken care of. Pretty simple, really. I opted for the high-index lenses, which cost an additional $30 - a very reasonable upcharge. Their high-index frames are also ashperic, and both of these upgrades decrease lens weight and distortion (which is great on a hefty prescription like mine).

Of course, Warby Parker glasses do have their shortcomings, but these are small compared to the overall value of the product. To me, the biggest issue is that the frames do not come in varying sizes, which limits options; there are many pairs that I loved the styling of but were too big for my small head and therefore not an option (I probably had three home-try-ons for each pair purchased, but this didn’t seem to be a problem with WP). And although I think WP’s retro-inspired frames are definitely attractive, I do think that some other high-end brands have slightly more refined designs (for instance, compare Warby Parker’s Downing to Garret Leight’s Hampton or Olver People’s O’Malley - the differences are subtle, but I find the styling on the latter two a bit more appealing). And although the material and construction quality is relatively high, I don’t think it’s quite at the level of more expensive brands. For instance, my opticals have a bit of a creaky sound to them - not from the hinges, but from the lenses rubbing against the frame. 
These comments definitely aren’t to say that I think Warby Parker glasses are a bad deal, though; the fact that I’m comparing them to glasses 3-5x their price should be an indicator of that. This blog focuses on products that provide a great value for their relative cost, and Warby Parker excels in that regard.
So if you’re optically challenged like myself or just need a go-to pair of shades for the upcoming summer, I highly recommend looking into Warby Parker if you haven’t already. I don’t think you’ll find better quality, styling, or customer service for under $100 anywhere else.

Product Review: Warby Parker Eyeglasses and Sunglasses

One of the common frustrations in my day-to-day life is the fact that I have bad eyes. They are weak in the sun, dry at night, and aren’t particularly good at seeing things that are close by or far away. It’s been a constant source of annoyance over the years, but I’ve quickly found that the best way to manage them is to take good care of them. Of course, anyone with a prescription knows the out-of-control cost of glasses these days; as you can probably imagine, that’s where Warby Parker comes into play.

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March 31, 2014
The Search for the Perfect Breton
Over the years there have been a few items that I have attempted to add to my wardrobe, only to be thwarted by unexpected problems. In these cases, I have spent hours trying to find the perfect item, only to discover issues with fit, style, or material. It is a frustrating experience and one that I’m sure many of you have had in one form or another.
One such item for me is the Breton - a classic men’s and women’s garment that, like so many others, began as a military uniform. The Breton was invented by Saint James for the French Navy in the 1850s; the classic navy/white stripes were supposedly used to help locate sailors that fell overboard. Since that time, the garment has become a symbol of casual elegance all over the world.
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There are many modern iterations of the classic Breton, several of which come from Saint James. The Binic II is the classic button-shouldered sweater, and the Meridien II is the traditional boatneck long-sleeve shirt. I have been looking to add something similar to the Meridien II to my summer wardrobe for years now, but a few things have been stopping me from purchasing the original. For starters, it’s a bit expensive (it’s just a shirt, after all), and the fit information is also ambiguous due to the unisex sizing. For these reasons, I decided to expand my search. 
My first attempt was off a tip from Put This On, who suggested looking into deadstock Soviet Telnyashkas. This military uniform is based off the French naval one, so the designs are essentially the same. I decided to give it a shot and picked one up on ebay for about $25. Unfortunately, the strange fit made the garment virtually unwearable, and the white stripes had a pink tinge to them, indicating a wash with something red in a past life. Strike one.
Now slightly jaded, I decided to go with something more familiar and searched the sale circuit for brands I was more comfortable with. I ended up finding a Breton from Gant on a discount site and picked it up. This time, though, the aggressive boatneck, 3/4 sleeves, and super-tight fit made the garment too effeminate to wear comfortably. Moreover, the shirt was made from a thin t-shirt cotton, rather than the heavy carded cotton used in the original. Good for some, perhaps, but not for me. Strike two.
At this point I was faced with a classic dilemma - give up my search and take my previous purchases as a loss, or persevere, carrying the guilt of previous unsuccessful purchases with me. I decided to end my search prematurely, and had to suffer through the summers of 2012 and 2013 without a Breton (I survived, somehow). 
I could drag this story on further, but I’ll wrap it up and say that the perfect Breton was hiding in plain sight the whole time, at the Uniqlo on Powell Street (and online). It was exactly what I wanted - a comfortably slim long-sleeve shirt with bold navy/white stripes and heavy cotton fabric. The Uniqlo model features a standard crewneck instead of the traditional boatneck, but this makes the garment a bit less bold and easier to “pull off” for the average man. The fit is true-to-size; I took my normal size (small) and it is a slim and comfortable fit. 
The best part? This Breton comes in at under $20 - the cheapest of the three I tried. Although I’m sure the quality isn’t quite on par with the traditional model, it’s plenty good for a simple cotton shirt. I plan on wearing mine like you see above - with beat-up chinos and loafers. If I’m feeling adventurous, I might even slip it on under a lightweight navy blazer. I might also sport it on my next sailing trip, just in case I tumble overboard after a few too many PBRs. 
EDIT: some readers mentioned a couple more great places to purchase inexpensive Bretons - MUJI and Armorlux. Both brands have a solid reputation and make great replicas of the original style. Thanks, guys!

The Search for the Perfect Breton

Over the years there have been a few items that I have attempted to add to my wardrobe, only to be thwarted by unexpected problems. In these cases, I have spent hours trying to find the perfect item, only to discover issues with fit, style, or material. It is a frustrating experience and one that I’m sure many of you have had in one form or another.

One such item for me is the Breton - a classic men’s and women’s garment that, like so many others, began as a military uniform. The Breton was invented by Saint James for the French Navy in the 1850s; the classic navy/white stripes were supposedly used to help locate sailors that fell overboard. Since that time, the garment has become a symbol of casual elegance all over the world.

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February 27, 2014
Product Review: J. Crew “Bowery” Classic Fit Dress Trousers
Many of the product reviews out in the blogosphere seem to center around expensive high-end products or new items from small companies. These can certainly be helpful, but there are still many people that want to find great products that are a bit more accessible (which is why sites like Dappered are so popular). For that reason, I’m going to try and balance my reviews with products that can be easily found anywhere but still provide a good value to me. 
In the past I have written about how much I like Howard Yount trousers; I stand by that review, but there are many people out there (including myself) that would prefer to not spend $100-$200 on dress pants. I splurged for some nice wool flannels since those are hard to find at lower prices, but for more traditional cotton and worsted wool pants there is a broader spectrum of prices available. 
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I had been keeping an eye on J. Crew’s Bowery trouser for a while, and when one of the inevitable 25% off full price item sales came along I grabbed a cotton pair in hickory. 
My first impressions were very good - of course, this is definitely a mass-produced garment and won’t have the attention to detail that you will see from smaller brands, but they are made well and feature solid materials and traditional details. The fabric is surprisingly nice; it is a mid-weight cotton that has some softness but isn’t heavily washed to create a “lived-in” feel like many chinos. These are dress pants, and the fabric reflects that. The fabric is also significantly better than Uniqlo’s celebrated Vintage Chino. The two pants are very different stylistically, but in terms of material and construction quality the Bowery trousers are much, much better. The trousers feature a cotton shirting liner on the pocket and waistband and have a metal clasp and zipper closure with an interior button as well. 

The pants do come with some extra fabric at the bottom to extend the length, but it’s worth noting that in my cotton ones there is already a very slight wear mark, meaning there might be a line if one were to lengthen them. If you are in between inseam lengths it’s probably better to size up and remove material than to do the reverse. 
As for the fit, these are very similar to my Howard Yount flannels (bought before the fit changed slightly). Mine are tagged 31x30 (my true size), and measure 8” across the leg opening. The rise is fairly “classic” and sits higher than most chinos on the market, which makes them good for tucking shirts into. There is a bit more room in the thigh than I’d prefer, but this is the case with almost all trousers I own because my ectomorph legs need a bit of work. Most guys will probably find the leg space reasonable.
I tried the Bowery Slim fit trousers, and although the thigh is a bit slimmer, they taper too much past the ankle for my tastes (and the rise is a bit lower as well). They may work for some, but are a bit trendier than what I look for in dress clothes.
All told, I think these are a great everyday business casual work pants for the guy who doesn’t need high wool counts or hand-stitching in their workhorse office clothes. With the frequent 20-30% off full-priced items, the cotton Bowery classics come to $56-$64 and the wool ones are $90-$102. Prices can dip even lower if the items themselves go on sale.

Product Review: J. Crew “Bowery” Classic Fit Dress Trousers

Many of the product reviews out in the blogosphere seem to center around expensive high-end products or new items from small companies. These can certainly be helpful, but there are still many people that want to find great products that are a bit more accessible (which is why sites like Dappered are so popular). For that reason, I’m going to try and balance my reviews with products that can be easily found anywhere but still provide a good value to me. 

In the past I have written about how much I like Howard Yount trousers; I stand by that review, but there are many people out there (including myself) that would prefer to not spend $100-$200 on dress pants. I splurged for some nice wool flannels since those are hard to find at lower prices, but for more traditional cotton and worsted wool pants there is a broader spectrum of prices available. 

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February 12, 2014
Product Review: Howard Yount Chestnut Stick Umbrella
Having a passion for men’s clothing is a bit of an infectious disease; it begins with trying to understand the basic principles of fit and function, but if left untreated it can spread to an aesthetic affliction that applies to every possible purchase. Before you know it, every piece of furniture or kitchen appliance you acquire must be held to the same stringent criteria that are applied to your shoes and suits. Such is the case with me, and this is why I began looking for a handsome umbrella that would meet the trifecta of aesthetics, quality, and price; the “good deal” that we all strive to find.
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A high-quality umbrella had been on my list of upgrades for a couple of years now, and after a bit of research I decided that I would go with either Howard Yount or Kent Wang, both of which are known for offering solid pieces at fair prices. I included both umbrellas at the top of my holiday gift list, in hopes that a loved one would see the hint and act accordingly. Fortunately for me, my girlfriend has a keen eye and was able to pick out my not-so-subtle hint with great finesse. 
The shaft of the umbrella is made of a single chestnut stick; this is the part of the umbrella that I feel differs the most from your typical drugstore model. The wood handle is incredibly handsome, and feels great in the hand. Now, the finishing is a bit drippy in some areas and some of the notches in the wood are a tad rough; these imperfections would probably not be present on a top-tier umbrella like a Brigg or Maglia (or at lest the ones I’ve examined)**, but either of those options will cost significantly more. Moreover, I think that most people looking at Howard Yount umbrellas are looking to try a high-end solid stick umbrella for the first time, not add to their existing collection; these ones are definitely a huge step up from the common plastic and metal variety.
**EDIT: Vox says that in his experience, Howard Yount’s umbrellas are on par with the brands I mentioned when it comes to finishing and quality. He knows his stuff, so his opinion is worth taking into account.

The canopy is navy polyester, which may draw a gasp from some that have deemed synthetics unfit for anything, but I think this is a perfectly good use of the material. Natural fiber canopy umbrellas do exist (see the Maglia Francescos linked above), but they are heavier, don’t always perform as well as their synthetic counterparts, and still require a synthetic waterproofing coat. The umbrella shown here is the navy herringbone, and has a subtle ribbed texture. The fabric is well-attached and aligned to make a pleasing dovetail pattern along the ribs.

As for performance, the umbrella does exactly what it is supposed to do and keeps me dry. So far it has performed well in moderate stormy conditions, but as of now I have not used it in any severe gusts. Umbrellas are prone to self-destruction in harsh winds, and I can’t yet say for sure whether this one will perform better than others in strong storms. The metal ribs seem to be strong, but there is certainly no high-tech gust-proof technology in place. If you live in an area where high winds are a serious problem, it may be worth looking at Davek, who designs their umbrellas with this in mind and includes a lifetime warranty. I don’t think that the Davek umbrellas are as handsome as this one, but the warranty might be good for those that are prone to destroying umbrellas.
Also, it is worth mentioning the size of the umbrella - although I think the 42” canopy is fairly standard for cane umbrellas like these, it is larger than many other common umbrellas, especially the ones that fold up into a small bundle. It is definitely large enough to keep two people dry.

All told, it seems that this umbrella does what many of Howard Yount’s products do - combine many of the qualities of high-end products, but at a more competitive price. I do think that Briggs and Maglias are a bit better, but not by much; as far as I’m concerned, this is as deep as I need to go into high-end umbrella territory. 
As I mentioned before, it is worth noting that Kent Wang also has umbrellas available at this price. They are also built to the same specifications and in the same country; in fact, I have a hunch that they are identical products. I mention this because both e-stores are often sold out, so if the umbrella you’re looking for is unavailable at one then it may be worth looking at the other.

Product Review: Howard Yount Chestnut Stick Umbrella

Having a passion for men’s clothing is a bit of an infectious disease; it begins with trying to understand the basic principles of fit and function, but if left untreated it can spread to an aesthetic affliction that applies to every possible purchase. Before you know it, every piece of furniture or kitchen appliance you acquire must be held to the same stringent criteria that are applied to your shoes and suits. Such is the case with me, and this is why I began looking for a handsome umbrella that would meet the trifecta of aesthetics, quality, and price; the “good deal” that we all strive to find.

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January 7, 2014
Product Review: Conrad Wu Ties
A month or two ago my good friend Jacob asked me if I had any experience with Conrad Wu ties - he had just ordered one himself, and was very excited to see the product firsthand. I admitted that I was not familiar with the company, but after perusing the website I was very intrigued and subscribed to their blog in hopes of learning more. I was pleasantly surprised the next morning when Conrad Wu himself reached out to me, thanked me for my interest, and offered to send me a sample to try.
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The first thing that attracted me to Conrad’s ties was the great selection of materials. Most of the ties have subtle, classic designs, but they all feature great materials and textures that are normally reserved for ties well above the $100 mark. Many of the ties are made out of textured silk or wool; the silks in particular are very enticing, and I ended up requesting the brown shantung silk seen above. Shantung silk is a variety of raw silk, who’s nubby texture comes from the fact that the silk is produced from wild silkworms rather than on silk farms. The shorter threads and differences in production create the subtle gnarly texture seen above. Many of Conrad’s ties feature some form of raw silk, although he also has ties made of more traditional materials.

As for construction - all of Conrad’s ties are made in New York City (except for the knits, which are German) and are composed of very nice European materials. The ties are three-fold construction, lightly lined, and are untipped with a hand-rolled edge. Conrad’s ties range from 8-8.5 cm (3.15-3.35”) in width, and have a slight taper up the tie. What I mean by this is that the tie stays fairly wide up the length of the tie, rather than slimming down quickly. Many people only use the tie’s end width to determine its size on the body, but the shape plays a large factor as well (this is something that I’ll write more about later on). Essentially, given the hearty materials used, the shape, and construction of the tie, I’ve found that Conrad’s ties give a substantial knot with a deep dimple (the knot below is a single four-in-hand). This is just a matter of preference, but worth knowing depending on what you are looking for.

I have one other tie made of raw silk, and this one has significantly more texture - again, just something to know depending on your personal preference. Nonetheless, the texture is still subtle and not very noticeable from a few feet away.
Another important aspect of Conrad’s ties is the price. They seem to range from about $70-95, which, although not inexpensive, is impressive given the material and construction quality. Like I mentioned before, many of the materials he uses for his ties are very hard to find at prices below $150 (they’re usually found at high-end companies like Drake’s). Also, use this as a point of reference - a full-priced tie from J. Crew costs between $65 and $90, and I can say from experience that they are completely inferior to Conrad’s (and also way too skinny) If you are looking for a well-made tie with unique fabric, hand-sewn details, and an honest price, Conrad Wu could be a great option.
Also - Conrad has an affiliate thread on styleforum; he will often post new ties and sales here, so it’s worth keeping an eye on if his wares appeal to you.

Product Review: Conrad Wu Ties

A month or two ago my good friend Jacob asked me if I had any experience with Conrad Wu ties - he had just ordered one himself, and was very excited to see the product firsthand. I admitted that I was not familiar with the company, but after perusing the website I was very intrigued and subscribed to their blog in hopes of learning more. I was pleasantly surprised the next morning when Conrad Wu himself reached out to me, thanked me for my interest, and offered to send me a sample to try.

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December 9, 2013
One Year Later: Howard Yount Flannel Trousers
As I’ve mentioned before, men’s clothing enthusiasts often tout the importance of buying high-quality products, an ideal that I generally agree with. Of course, few of us have the funds to buy the best of the best of everything, so the process of finding and purchasing clothing and accessories becomes more of a decision of when to save and when to splurge. Even then, cost does not inherently imply quality, so determining where money is well spent can be difficult. This is a series of posts that show some of my purchases (both expensive and affordable) after a year or more of hard wear in order to display how they have held up over time. Only you can decide what is worth spending on and what isn’t, but the more information you have the better-informed your decision will be.
Finding nice trousers can be a challenge. There are endless options for casual chinos, but things get trickier when you’re looking for something a bit more dressed up. Moreover, they can get expensive very quickly - with made-in-China wool trousers from J. Crew going as high as $250, it’s hard to figure out what a reasonable price for a good pair of odd trousers is.
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It’s reasons like this that have made Howard Yount’s trousers the celebrated choice for many bloggers, including myself. Although they are not cheap, they are honestly priced and carry less brand markup than a similar item from other brands like Ralph Lauren or Incotex. Howard Yount’s wool trousers are made in Italy or the USA out of high-end fabrics (Vitale Barberis Canonico, in this case), and feature all the great details you would hope for. I had been eyeing a pair of flannels for a long time, and eventually bit when the sale price hit $165. To this day, that remains the most that I have ever spent on pants. Add on $35 in tailoring (hem, cuff, and waistband adjustment), and it was by no means a cheap purchase. Nonetheless, I enjoy them immensely and have no regrets whatsoever.

First off, the fabric on these is as nice as any other wool garment I own. This pair is a mid-weight flannel, but I believe Howard Yount now has trousers is several weights. Flannel is often praised for its soft, fuzzy hand, and although I enjoy that aspect of it, I particularly love the incredible depth of its color. These may be simple gray pants, but they look much more rich and complex with their lovely marled fabric.

In terms of durability, I have not seen any signs of wear or tear over the past two winters. It is true that flannels are a bit more fragile then some of their woolen counterparts (and woolen flannels moreso than worsted), but as long as you don’t wear them continuously for a whole season I don’t expect there will be a problem. I wear mine about once per week when the weather is appropriate, which could happen at any point in the year in San Francisco. Will Boehlke recommends giving flannels at least two days of “rest” before wearing again, and I think his advice is sound (as usual). I also try to minimize dry cleaning, both to increase longevity and save money. Once or twice per year is usually plenty.
As I mentioned, Howard Yount’s trousers are not inexpensive, but I feel that they offer a good bargain nonetheless. They are made in Italy of high-end materials from mills like VBC and Angelico, and feature signs of high quality like a split waistband (for ease of waist adjustment), hand stitching, knee-length liner, and belt buckle loop (like Incotex). I’m confident that these trousers are very similar to other great pairs out there, but without the brand affiliation and at a much lower price. 

I should note that the fit of the trousers has changed slightly since I last ordered - it looks like there is a bit more taper below the knee. I have no direct experience with this new fit, and although I like the fit of the ones I have, the new measurements don’t look too different. I’m planning on picking up a second pair soon, because these tend to disappear quickly. I’ll report back if the fit seems drastically changed but I imagine that they will still look and feel pretty dang good.
 The rest of the “One Year Later” series can be found here.

One Year Later: Howard Yount Flannel Trousers

As I’ve mentioned before, men’s clothing enthusiasts often tout the importance of buying high-quality products, an ideal that I generally agree with. Of course, few of us have the funds to buy the best of the best of everything, so the process of finding and purchasing clothing and accessories becomes more of a decision of when to save and when to splurge. Even then, cost does not inherently imply quality, so determining where money is well spent can be difficult. This is a series of posts that show some of my purchases (both expensive and affordable) after a year or more of hard wear in order to display how they have held up over time. Only you can decide what is worth spending on and what isn’t, but the more information you have the better-informed your decision will be.

Finding nice trousers can be a challenge. There are endless options for casual chinos, but things get trickier when you’re looking for something a bit more dressed up. Moreover, they can get expensive very quickly - with made-in-China wool trousers from J. Crew going as high as $250, it’s hard to figure out what a reasonable price for a good pair of odd trousers is.

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November 12, 2013

Product Review: Solosso Shirting

I was recently contacted by Jan Klimo of Solosso, who asked if I was interested in trying out one of their shirts. As many of my readers know, I have tried several made-to-measure (MTM) shirting companies in the past, but the amount of companies that perform this service has grown wildly and they now are available at every pricepoint and with a myriad of customization options, making it almost impossible to see the differences in companies. I have stopped experimenting with these companies for the most part; not because there are no better options, but because I have found a company that works for me and don’t want to start the MTM process over. Although Solosso is fairly straightforward in many ways, one aspect that caught my attention was their dedication to eco-friendly and sustainable practices. As someone who studied “cradle-to-grave” lifecycle analyses of products in school (hooray engineering!), I find the amount of materials and energy that go into creating the products surrounding us staggering and somewhat frightening. Solosso’s efforts in creating a transparent and environmentally responsible company are definitely noteworthy. The only other clothing company I know of that has a similar dedication to sustainable practices is Glass House Shritmakers out of Chicago. 

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September 3, 2013

One Year Later: Boglioli Cotton “Coat” Blazer

As I’ve mentioned before, men’s clothing enthusiasts often tout the importance of buying high-quality products, an ideal that I generally agree with. Of course, few of us have the funds to buy the best of the best of everything, so the process of finding and purchasing clothing and accessories becomes more of a decision of when to save and when to splurge. Even then, cost does not inherently imply quality, so determining where money is well spent can be difficult. This is a series of posts that show some of my purchases (both expensive and affordable) after a year or more of hard wear in order to display how they have held up over time. Only you can decide what is worth spending on and what isn’t, but the more information you have the better-informed your decision will be.

Whenever I post pictures of myself on this blog I always make a point to document what I’m wearing. I’ve found it helpful when other bloggers do this, so it seems reasonable that I should take the time to do the same. Even so, whenever a picture of this blazer ends up on my site I get tons of questions asking who makes it, where I got it, and how much it costs. So let me set the record straight, once and for all: this blazer is made by Boglioli. I bought it off of farfetch.com, the discount site for around $400. I’ve had it for well over a year now, so it seems like a good time to check in and reevaluate the purchase. 

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August 12, 2013
I love knit ties. I wear a tie several times per week, and when I grab one from my closet I almost always end up reaching for a knit. In my opinion, their informal nature makes them that much easier to wear in a business casual setting. I have four knit ties, which isn’t a huge number, but given that my whole collection sits at around a dozen it’s a noteworthy amount.
I got this bicolor knit a while back from Kent Wang, the famous internet haberdasher. His web store is full of items that are smart and simple, and I thoroughly enjoy the aesthetic that he creates with his products.
The tie is 2.75” wide (a good width for a knit) and is made of pure silk in Italy. It’s not as crunchy as my RLPL knit (seen here), but it has a good thickness and doesn’t feel as machined and sock-like as some of my more inexpensive ones. The iridescence created by the dual thread colors is hard to describe; the colors shift dominance depending on the viewer’s angle, which gives the tie some visual interest without becoming too loud. Although the tie is available in other color pairings, I think this one is ideal because both hues are so easy to wear.
It’s worth noting that the Kent’s ties are on the long side, measuring around 59”. This makes tying a good knot a bit harder for me since I am of average height and have a thin neck, but once I do get a good knot this tie looks great. It adds the perfect amount of visual complexity while still enhancing a neutral color palette. You can see it in action here.

I love knit ties. I wear a tie several times per week, and when I grab one from my closet I almost always end up reaching for a knit. In my opinion, their informal nature makes them that much easier to wear in a business casual setting. I have four knit ties, which isn’t a huge number, but given that my whole collection sits at around a dozen it’s a noteworthy amount.

I got this bicolor knit a while back from Kent Wang, the famous internet haberdasher. His web store is full of items that are smart and simple, and I thoroughly enjoy the aesthetic that he creates with his products.

The tie is 2.75” wide (a good width for a knit) and is made of pure silk in Italy. It’s not as crunchy as my RLPL knit (seen here), but it has a good thickness and doesn’t feel as machined and sock-like as some of my more inexpensive ones. The iridescence created by the dual thread colors is hard to describe; the colors shift dominance depending on the viewer’s angle, which gives the tie some visual interest without becoming too loud. Although the tie is available in other color pairings, I think this one is ideal because both hues are so easy to wear.

It’s worth noting that the Kent’s ties are on the long side, measuring around 59”. This makes tying a good knot a bit harder for me since I am of average height and have a thin neck, but once I do get a good knot this tie looks great. It adds the perfect amount of visual complexity while still enhancing a neutral color palette. You can see it in action here.

July 29, 2013

A Closer Look at Beckett & Robb

Part III: The Final Product & Review

Previously: Part I, Part II.

I’ve thoroughly enjoyed documenting the suit creation process with Dustin and the Beckett & Robb team, but the most exciting part of a custom commission is receiving the final product. I’m certainly one to agonize over made-to-measure products while waiting for delivery, and this was no different. Fortunately, the suit was delivered right on time and I was asked to stop by for the final fitting and to hopefully take the suit home. 

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