July 22, 2014

It’s On Sale: 25% Off Sale Items at East Dane

I haven’t been paying much attention to this new-ish online men’s store, but perhaps it’s time for me to start. I saw that they are holding a 25% sale off discounted items with the code 25EXTRA and that creates some pretty great deals on some high-end clothing and accessories. My picks:

Incotex Chinolino trousers  and slim chinos starting at $124: A great price for one of the most celebrated trouser makers around. I’m very tempted by these.

Ernest Alexander leather overnight bag and waxed canvas rucksack: I love Ernest Alexander products (and currently own a few), and they are never discounted this deeply. Stock is low, but there’s a lot of potential here.

Inis Meain linen crewneck sweater, $148: There are some other options from this esteemed sweater company, but this is my favorite. 

Some Drake’s Accessories: The more subtle stuff is selling out very fast, but there’s still a decent selection to choose from. 

There are definitely other worthwhile items in the sale, but sizes are becoming scarce for many of them. Take a look and see what’s left in your size!

July 21, 2014
Men’s Clothing, Accessories, and Services in San Francisco and Beyond

Most of the questions my fellow bloggers and I seem to receive are inquiries for local information - the best stores, best tailors, and so on. These are reasonable questions, to be sure, but it can be difficult to answer them all. For that reason, I’ve compiled this super cool interactive map that should help everyone out, whether you’re just in town for the afternoon or you’re a seasoned local looking for a new place to get a haircut.

I will do my best to keep this map updated and accurate, but understand that stores open, close, and move all the time. And although I’ve tried to be as thorough as possible, I have undoubtedly missed places worth mentioning. For that reason, I encourage everyone to add their suggestions, additions, and corrections in the comments below. 

Anyway, here it is (if you’re reading this on tumblr, you’ll have to click the little gray box to see the map; if you’re on tumblr mobile, you’re probably out of luck). There’s a lot of information crammed in this map, so hit the “full screen” icon on the top right to be taken to the original size. 

The map is divided into three layers - clothing and accessories, barbers, and alteration tailors. I included websites, addresses and a brief description of the establishment in each pin. There’s a lot of information to digest, so I’ve copied it all below as well. 

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July 14, 2014
The Summer Staples, Revisited
Last year I posted a photo outlining my core pieces for the Spring and Summer months. As I anticipated, I did wear all those items extensively last year, and continue to do so now. However, my lifestyle has changed a bit in the past year and I find myself having less opportunities to wear sportcoats and ties; for that reason, I thought I would update with a version more congruent with what I’m wearing now. So here are my summer 2014 all-stars, piece by piece:
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Popover: Proper Cloth. I was very excited when my favorite custom shirtmaker released a popover style a few months ago. Although many have been searching the interwebz for popovers utilizing Italian-inspired cutaway collars, I went for a more traditional approach and paired a lightweight chambray fabric with an ample button-down collar (inspired in no small part by voxsart's collection). As many other menswear blogger types have noted, popovers are a great item to have on hand during the warmer months - they toe the line between dressed up and laid back, and that’s exactly what I need. 
Field Jacket: Gap. Yeah, that’s right. Gap. I mentioned this jacket in my M-65 roundup, and after consulting my own positive remarks, decided to buy it. It ended up being under $50 shipped and has already proven to be a great purchase. San Francisco summers are notoriously chilly, so I am often forced to bring a light jacket with me during my summer outings. This one is exactly what I need - lightweight, durable, well-fitting, and in a color that goes with everything. I have another M-65 in the classic army green, but find myself reaching for this one more often (sorry, Gant). Oh, and it’s currently on sale for $52.50 with the code EXTRA…not bad. 
Shades: Warby Parker “Sinclair”. These shades are now over two years old, which might be a world record for sunglasses. They’re with me almost every day and have held up remarkably well. I like the idea of having multiple pairs of glasses to choose between, but find myself grabbing these so often that I haven’t bothered picking up a different pair. 
White chinos: J. Crew Urban Slim Fit. This cut isn’t perfect for my build - a bit too big in the thigh and a smidge too tapered at the ankle - but they’re reasonably well-made and easy to grab on sale. I bought a few brand new pairs on ebay a couple years ago for next to nothing and they still get worn all the time. I like wearing light-colored chinos in the summer months, and these white ones help me remember that it’s probably really lovely out in Oakland and Palo Alto, even though it’s cold and foggy in SF. 
Lighweight suede chukkas: J. Crew. I’m a little tight on funds right now, so although I have been lusting over Alden’s unlined suede shoes for a while, I jumped at the opportunity to try these chukkas for the sweet price of $60. They’re certainly not as nice, but for a cool 1/9th of the price I ain’t mad at all. As a matter of fact, I’m downright impressed. The color of the suede is exactly what I wanted, the construction is pretty solid, and the toe shape is great. And although they’re currently only available in blue suede, they’re on final sale for a screaming $42 - read more here. 
I had no intention of writing an article about how you can still dress well without spending too much money, but I suppose that’s exactly what happened. All of these items were relatively affordable (all purchased for under $100), and they have each earned a top spot in my summer rotation. There’s nothing wrong with appreciating high-end clothing and investing in it - I certainly do. That said, it’s important to keep some perspective; when you start to have the opinion that nothing inexpensive can be good, you’ve gone in too deep. It may be more difficult to dress well on a tight budget, but it’s far from impossible. 

The Summer Staples, Revisited

Last year I posted a photo outlining my core pieces for the Spring and Summer months. As I anticipated, I did wear all those items extensively last year, and continue to do so now. However, my lifestyle has changed a bit in the past year and I find myself having less opportunities to wear sportcoats and ties; for that reason, I thought I would update with a version more congruent with what I’m wearing now. So here are my summer 2014 all-stars, piece by piece:

Read More

July 10, 2014
It’s On Sale: Swim Trunks at J. Crew
Still looking for a pair of swim trunks this summer? J. Crew is currently offering 50% off sale items with the code TODAYONLY, which brings a large selection of swim trunks down to as low as $15. My favorites are the 6” navy tonal seersucker ones pictured above, currently at $35 with the code (also available in a 9” length, if that’s more your thing). You can browse all the swimwear stock on sale here. Note that some of those models don’t have a mesh lining, so keep an eye out if that’s something you want. 
There are other items included in the sale, of course, but these are what stood out to me. Although I like the idea of high-end swimwear, there’s no way I’m going to pay more than $50 for a pair of trunks. I currently use a pair of J. Crew’s trunks from last year and they have been great for the price. 

It’s On Sale: Swim Trunks at J. Crew

Still looking for a pair of swim trunks this summer? J. Crew is currently offering 50% off sale items with the code TODAYONLY, which brings a large selection of swim trunks down to as low as $15. My favorites are the 6” navy tonal seersucker ones pictured above, currently at $35 with the code (also available in a 9” length, if that’s more your thing). You can browse all the swimwear stock on sale here. Note that some of those models don’t have a mesh lining, so keep an eye out if that’s something you want. 

There are other items included in the sale, of course, but these are what stood out to me. Although I like the idea of high-end swimwear, there’s no way I’m going to pay more than $50 for a pair of trunks. I currently use a pair of J. Crew’s trunks from last year and they have been great for the price. 

July 7, 2014
Mastering a Necessary Evil - How to Iron a Shirt
I’ve seen many men talk about how relaxing, cathartic, and otherwise enjoyable it is to polish shoes. It’s one of those tasks that is perfectly fit for a slow Sunday afternoon, and it reigns supreme as the most popular clothing maintenance routine. 
Ironing, on the other hand, doesn’t get any love from anyone and usually holds the bottom spot in most to-do lists. Some prefer to outsource the work to a local cleaner, and some just ignore the problem altogether (this is me, usually). Neither of these options is preferable, of course. Dry cleaning shirts is unnecessarily tough on the fabric, and professional washing and folding can get expensive quickly. There may be times when wearing an unironed shirt can work, but not when you need to look sharp.
As with most things, successful ironing comes down to the tools you use and the procedure you follow. I won’t claim to be an expert in this field, but over the years I have found a few ways to improve my end result.
[[MORE]]
My best ironing trick comes from the fact that I hate ironing boards. The big ones take up tons of precious space, the small ones are useless, and they all jam, squeak or frustrate me in one way or another. For that reason, I put a clean cloth over a table or countertop for my ironing surface. Of course, for this to work you must make sure that the surface and and cloth are clean, and that heat and moisture will not damage either (which, in turn, could also damage your clothing). I don’t want any angry emails from people that put an iron mark on their grandmother’s antique oak table, ok?  Here, I’m using an old fitted bed sheet over an inexpensive IKEA table that I bought secondhand. I have also used stone countertops successfully. The advantage here is that I have much more space to iron in (a huge plus), and I don’t have to fight a rusty appliance in and out of the closet. All told, this change made a big difference in the amount of time it took me to iron a shirt and the quality of the end result. 
When it comes to irons, there is a big range in quality and cost; I have never used a high-end one, but I’m sure that they are easier to use. That said, I don’t think they are strictly necessary. To me, the basic requirements of a decent iron are heat, even bursts of steam, and a water spray function. If you don’t know where to look for an iron, this Black & Decker model on Amazon is a good starting point (and is the one I would probably buy if I were in the market). Many say to use purified water; this is probably optimal, but I’ve never used it and been ok thus far. It’s also worth noting that shirts are easier to iron when they’re still damp from the washer, but this is not strictly necessary.
Ok, time to iron. Here’s what I do:
1. Start with the shirt sides. Don’t be afraid to use the steam burst button liberally to get heavy wrinkles out. Iron up to the seam running along the sides of the shirt.

2. Move on to the sleeves. Lay them out flat and make sure to push out any wrinkles or folds, since you will be ironing both sides of the sleeve with one motion. If you have the time, flip the sleeve over and iron on the reverse side. Make sure that the gusset and cuff buttons are undone, and don’t forget about ironing the cuffs too. 


3. Iron the inside of the collar. Use lots of steam. 

4. Lay the shirt out, facing up, and iron out the inside of the back panel. Take time to make sure that you’re getting all the edges and shoulders.


5. Button a center button or two and make sure the sides look ok. Touch up any areas that you may have missed earlier.


6. Fold it up or get it on a hanger. Or just put the dang thing on, because let’s be honest - you were doing this whole thing shirtless and you’re already fifteen minutes late for work. 

Mastering a Necessary Evil - How to Iron a Shirt

I’ve seen many men talk about how relaxing, cathartic, and otherwise enjoyable it is to polish shoes. It’s one of those tasks that is perfectly fit for a slow Sunday afternoon, and it reigns supreme as the most popular clothing maintenance routine. 

Ironing, on the other hand, doesn’t get any love from anyone and usually holds the bottom spot in most to-do lists. Some prefer to outsource the work to a local cleaner, and some just ignore the problem altogether (this is me, usually). Neither of these options is preferable, of course. Dry cleaning shirts is unnecessarily tough on the fabric, and professional washing and folding can get expensive quickly. There may be times when wearing an unironed shirt can work, but not when you need to look sharp.

As with most things, successful ironing comes down to the tools you use and the procedure you follow. I won’t claim to be an expert in this field, but over the years I have found a few ways to improve my end result.

Read More

July 4, 2014

Fourth of July Sales

It’s pretty unlikely that I’ll be doing any shopping today, but I couldn’t help but notice all the sales going on this weekend. I’m generally not a big fan of holiday sales but I will admit that they can be a good opportunity to purchase seasonally relevant clothing before the weather begins to change. Here are a few quick picks:

Read More

July 1, 2014
What I Wore Last Weekend - San Francisco Summer
I told you guys that summers in SF were gray and chilly, and I wasn’t kidding. 
As an aside - I’ll be in my home state of Oregon for a few days, so regular posting will probably resume some time next week. If you’d like to stay in the loop while I’m away, follow me on twitter and instagram. 
Field Jacket - Gap | Denim - A.P.C. | Shirt - Uniqlo | Sneakers - Superga

What I Wore Last Weekend - San Francisco Summer

I told you guys that summers in SF were gray and chilly, and I wasn’t kidding. 

As an aside - I’ll be in my home state of Oregon for a few days, so regular posting will probably resume some time next week. If you’d like to stay in the loop while I’m away, follow me on twitter and instagram

Field Jacket - Gap | Denim - A.P.C. | Shirt - Uniqlo | Sneakers - Superga

June 26, 2014
Out & About: The Alden Shop of San Francisco (170 Sutter St.)
There are quite a few clothing stores in downtown San Francisco. Some are common and approachable, like Uniqlo and Macy’s, while others like Nieman Marcus and Wilkes Bashford are only for the true ballers among us. Of course, it should come as no surprise that my favorite store is neither of these things - it is small, unassuming, and focused on doing just one thing but doing it well. It’s something surprisingly unique to the Bay Area, too - the Alden Shop of San Francisco.
I know what you’re thinking: “I thought Alden was a Massachusetts brand! It says ‘New England’ right there in the photo!” Well, you’re not wrong, but it’s a bit more complicated than that. Alden shoes are indeed made in New England, and they’re sold at high-end retailers all over the world. What makes the San Francisco shop unique is that it is one of only two stores that is directly affiliated with the factory (the other one is in Washington, D.C.). For that reason, it is the biggest - and best - collection of Alden shoes anywhere.[[MORE]]
As most of you know, Alden is considered by many to be the quintessential American shoe company; although there were many in decades past, most of them have declined into corrected grain oblivion. Fortunately for us, Alden has continued to make exceptionally handsome and comfortable shoes out of wonderful materials. These shoes are not particularly dressy, sleek, or sexy; rather, they’re solid, informal, and decidedly American-looking. 
I had a chance to chat with Mike Golden, general manager of the store, and we discussed a few aspects of the San Francisco shop that make it unique. The first is its breadth - the store has a huge amount of styles, most of which are available in a large size range (from 6AA to 14EEE). I personally verified this by taking a quick peek in the back room - there are thousands of little green boxes back there. If you order a pair of Aldens online from their website the order will be fulfilled from the San Francisco shop for this reason. 
The second point of distinction is that the shop carries many unique models due to its close relationship with the factory. You will often see shoes and boots bear the store’s name on their insole, a sign that they were made expressly for this location. Some models catch on and are brought into the regular rotation. Others end up on the top-secret sale display in the back of the shop (it’s one of the very few places you can find discounted Aldens).
The last (and perhaps the most important) unique aspect of the SF Alden shop is their access to rare makeups. Those that keep up with the shell cordovan scene know that Alden is one of the best companies around when it comes to working with the unique material, and that there are many rare models that never get to see the light of day. Colors like cigar, whiskey, and ravello are made in very small quantities by Horween and are extremely difficult to find. Mike told me that they never advertise the available stock in these rare models because they sell so quickly. What’s a blogger to do, then? Just give the store a call and they’ll happily tell you what they have in the back room. In fact, while I was chatting with the staff, we had to pause for an incoming phone call - a gentleman wanted a pair of 12D longwings in whiskey cordovan, and it was his lucky day.
Alden’s prolific use of Horween shell cordovan has made them popular in many circles, but it’s important to remember that they have many other classic models as well. Personally, my favorite are Alden’s suede shoes. They are soft, supple, and come in a beautiful array of colors - I have a hard time resisting the urge to buy them whenever I stop in.
I took a few pictures around the tiny store, but the best way to experience it is to stop by. The shop is small enough that you could walk right by it if you weren’t paying attention, but that’s just part of what makes it so special. It’s like a little secret club for people that appreciate simplicity and good taste. Be sure to take a peek next time you’re in the area.


Suede unlined loafers - perfect for summer.

The Horween Cordovan wall - only black and #8 colors are displayed. 

Unlined bluchers - I’m hoping to grab a pair in suede soon. 

Nobody does tassel loafers better then Alden. 

Blue suede shoes. 

A simple but rare shoe - Alden’s chukka boot in Horween ravello cordovan.  

Out & About: The Alden Shop of San Francisco (170 Sutter St.)

There are quite a few clothing stores in downtown San Francisco. Some are common and approachable, like Uniqlo and Macy’s, while others like Nieman Marcus and Wilkes Bashford are only for the true ballers among us. Of course, it should come as no surprise that my favorite store is neither of these things - it is small, unassuming, and focused on doing just one thing but doing it well. It’s something surprisingly unique to the Bay Area, too - the Alden Shop of San Francisco.

I know what you’re thinking: “I thought Alden was a Massachusetts brand! It says ‘New England’ right there in the photo!” Well, you’re not wrong, but it’s a bit more complicated than that. Alden shoes are indeed made in New England, and they’re sold at high-end retailers all over the world. What makes the San Francisco shop unique is that it is one of only two stores that is directly affiliated with the factory (the other one is in Washington, D.C.). For that reason, it is the biggest - and best - collection of Alden shoes anywhere.

Read More

June 23, 2014
Product Review - SuitSupply Tuxedo
This might be my most off-season review yet, but I’m going for it anyway. Why? Because although there is certainly a black tie “season,” the beauty of the Black Tie Event is that it can strike at any time. The key is preparedness, because you’ll never have time to create a black tie rig from scratch once the event is on the calendar. It may hurt to drop serious cash on a thing you have no immediate use for, but once a tuxedo is in your closet the opportunities to use it have a way of appearing - that’s just how these things work.
I attend black tie events at least once per year, and I have been planning a tuxedo purchase for a while now. I have had good experiences with SuitSupply in the past, and their classic tuxedo has been in my crosshairs for a good amount of time. Their tuxedo is interesting to me because it is often recommended as the best tux for the price, and yet there is very little information available on it. I’m not sure if the people recommending it aren’t speaking from experience or if the people that own them just keep it to themselves, but either way there is little to be learned about this garment on the internet. I decided to take the plunge; here’s what I learned.[[MORE]]
When it comes to tuxedo details, historical black tie is very particular, and SuitSupply hits almost all of these details on the head (here’s some info on classic tuxedo styling if you need a refresher). This is what Suitsupply gets right:
Generous peak lapels. Shawl is appropriate too, but peak is the classic choice. Black tie is no place for skinny lapels.
Grosgrain silk facing on the lapel, trouser braid, pockets, and buttons. Satin is a fine choice as well, but grosgrain is the more subtle, and therefore more #menswear, choice.
One button closure. 
Jetted jacket pockets, no ticket pocket. 
Double vents. Having no vents is the historically correct choice, but it feels rather dated and just doesn’t function as well (it gets bunched up when you sit or put your hands in your pockets). Double vents are a perfectly fine substitute, in my opinion. 
No belt loops. Tuxedos should be held up with black silk suspenders (suspender buttons are included in the SuitSupply model shown here).
Structured and roped shoulder.
Black wool fabric without texture or pattern. Midnight blue is another good choice, but black is the modern standard.
These criteria might seem random and unnecessary, but I find them to have more than just historical value. To me, tuxedos should follow two main principles: minimalism (no extra flaps, buttons, etc) and differentiation from business suits (peak lapels, silk trimming, etc). With these ideas in mind, tuxedos make a bit more sense. Essentially, you’re looking to have a simple uniform that allows women to be the center of attention at these formal events, but you still want to show that it’s a celebration and not just business as usual. 

Anyway, my point is that most tuxedos on the market - whether $200 or $2,000 - get many of these criteria wrong. Even before the question of quality or value enter the equation, the SuitSupply tuxedo is already looking like a great option. 
I had been eyeing this tuxedo for a long time for this reason, but was confused by the product measurements posted online. SuitSupply does a great job of giving detailed garment measurements, so I was concerned to see that the numbers for my usual size of 36R seemed strange. Many of the measurements seemed too big - even bigger than I might expect from a 38R. Fortunately, SuitSupply has a great return policy so I ordered my usual 36R and a 34R as well.
When the package arrived in its classic tombstone box, I tried the 36R on first; I never even put on the 34R because it was immediately clear that 36R was the correct option. The fit is a bit more generous than my Havana fit jacket (the tuxedo is based off the Napoli fit), but not nearly as much as the measurements implied. 
The fit is different than my Havana blazer in a few ways. First, I was pleasantly suprised and relieved to find that the button stance and jacket length are both lower on this model, which makes the jacket more traditional. The lower button stance is especially welcome, since a high jacket “waist” gives men a rather hip-heavy look, unlike the strong “V” of a lower stance (and if there’s any jacket that needs to be hyper-masculine, it’s this one). The jacket and trousers both needed a moderate amount of work from my tailor to fit correctly, but these are just natural variations of my body and shouldn’t be taken to mean that the jacket won’t fit well on someone else. All of the measurements seem reasonable and accommodating, and I think that taking your normal size will result in a good starting point for any tailor. For reference - I had the pants hemmed, waist let out 1/2”, sleeves lengthened 1/4”, and the jacket back cleaned up. All told, the tuxedo fit is a bit more generous in the shoulders and chest, but fairly slim in the waist and legs (the legs in particular are quite slim, and may be too much so for some). Take that into consideration when you’re thinking about ordering, but remember that SuitSupply has a great return policy. 

The material is a simple black Super 110s worsted wool from Vitale Barberis Canonico in Italy. In all honesty, it feels quite plain, but that is the nature of worsted wool. A bit more sheen - perhaps a mohair/wool blend - would have been a welcome addition, but certainly not necessary. I also would have preferred midnight blue over black, but can’t argue with the choice, since black is the most conservative option. And I often find that midnight blue tuxedos, much like shawl collars, are something that often sounds good on paper but is poorly executed in reality. Black wool is simple and reliable, and I have no problem with that.
To be perfectly honest, I doubt I could pick this fabric out from others like it; nonetheless, I appreciate SuitSupply using a name-brand fabric like VBC to give me assurance of quality, origin, and composition. I have been burned by shoddy fabric in the past, so it’s good to see a familiar name and country of origin on the label.
So, the big question: is this tuxedo worth it? Well, I can confidently say that, quality aside, I have not found another tuxedo at or under the $600 mark that has so many of the ideal tuxedo details correct. Most inexpensive tuxedos are notch lapeled, two-buttoned, flap-pocketed, black shiny suits. The tuxedo should be a strong deviation from a traditional business suit, while remaining true to its minimalist roots. The fact that this garment is very true to the classic details, half-canvassed, and made out of respectable Italian cloth (in China, as would be expected for the price) shows that SuitSupply is serious about getting this garment right.
Right now, this tuxedo is priced at $569. Not too long ago, it was listed at $469, and for that price it was undoubtedly the best option out there. The extra $100 puts it a bit closer to some good made-to-measure options, which usually start entering the field around $700 and go up from there (I am not including online-only MTM services like Indochino, because I feel that getting suits made over the internet is too risky of a venture). I strongly considered getting my friends at Beckett & Robb to make me a tuxedo with specifications virtually identical to this one, but it came down to this - a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. Sure, with the additional cost of alterations the difference in cost may have been less than $100. But with Suitsupply, I have a nearly perfect garment ready to go, whereas the other is only the potential for one.
Although I wish this tuxedo still cost $469, I can’t find a better choice for traditional black tie at anywhere near that price. If I had to recommend an off-the-rack tuxedo for under $800 it would undoubtedly be SuitSupply. Now go and join Team Tuxedo - I’ll see you out there.

Photos by Majd Taby

Product Review - SuitSupply Tuxedo

This might be my most off-season review yet, but I’m going for it anyway. Why? Because although there is certainly a black tie “season,” the beauty of the Black Tie Event is that it can strike at any time. The key is preparedness, because you’ll never have time to create a black tie rig from scratch once the event is on the calendar. It may hurt to drop serious cash on a thing you have no immediate use for, but once a tuxedo is in your closet the opportunities to use it have a way of appearing - that’s just how these things work.

I attend black tie events at least once per year, and I have been planning a tuxedo purchase for a while now. I have had good experiences with SuitSupply in the past, and their classic tuxedo has been in my crosshairs for a good amount of time. Their tuxedo is interesting to me because it is often recommended as the best tux for the price, and yet there is very little information available on it. I’m not sure if the people recommending it aren’t speaking from experience or if the people that own them just keep it to themselves, but either way there is little to be learned about this garment on the internet. I decided to take the plunge; here’s what I learned.

Read More

June 20, 2014
It’s On Sale: 14% Off at Self Edge (in-store and online)
Self Edge, one of the best denim and workwear stores around,is having a rare sale this weekend to celebrate the much-anticipated launch of their new website. The sale runs from today until Sunday in stores and until Monday online (code JeanFinder will get you 14% off and free shipping worldwide). Self Edge has retail locations in San Francisco, New York City, Los Angeles, and Portland.
Of course, 14% off doesn’t sound like much of a discount (and hardly covers sales tax here in San Francisco), but the items that Self Edge carries are extremely difficult to find on sale, so this is about as low as things go. If you’ve been thinking about picking up a high-end pair of selvage denim, this is a good opportunity to do so. The sale starts at 9am online - if you’re interested in getting something I’d scope it out now since sizes can go quickly.
(Photo via edwinzee)

It’s On Sale: 14% Off at Self Edge (in-store and online)

Self Edge, one of the best denim and workwear stores around,is having a rare sale this weekend to celebrate the much-anticipated launch of their new website. The sale runs from today until Sunday in stores and until Monday online (code JeanFinder will get you 14% off and free shipping worldwide). Self Edge has retail locations in San Francisco, New York City, Los Angeles, and Portland.

Of course, 14% off doesn’t sound like much of a discount (and hardly covers sales tax here in San Francisco), but the items that Self Edge carries are extremely difficult to find on sale, so this is about as low as things go. If you’ve been thinking about picking up a high-end pair of selvage denim, this is a good opportunity to do so. The sale starts at 9am online - if you’re interested in getting something I’d scope it out now since sizes can go quickly.

(Photo via edwinzee)